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Approval!

Well, today's post shall be short and sweet. I just received approval from the Knox County Public Library/McClung collection to utilize their photos for this blog. Now I can get this bird off the ground. If you are at all concerned about the fate of 710 and 712 Walnut Street, I urge you to visit Knoxville Urban Guy over at Stuck Inside of Knoxville (with the urban blues again). He has the links to all of the relevant articles. http://stuckinsideofknoxville.blogspot.com/2011/11/are-we-still-tearing-down-knoxville-st.html

Next time I hope to hit you with my first content heavy post, but we'll have to see how events play out tomorrow at the CBID meeting tomorrow. Here's hoping for a good outcome for Knoxville's history and future!

Comments

Andrea said…
I'm really looking forward to your blog. I want to know more about the Vendome building you mentioned in your previous post.
Hey Andrea,

Thanks for keeping the faith. My life recently took an interesting turn so that I was unable to get going as soon as I would have liked. The post is forthcoming and it will focus on the Vendome. Good call.
Anonymous said…
I'm looking forward to this as well. Does any photographic evidence exist of the Vendome?

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